Category Archives: Exhibitions

Currents 115: Jennifer Bornstein

Inspired by artists who used photography and video such as Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, and Joan Jonas, the 2017-2018 Henry L. and Natalie E. Freund Fellow, Jennifer Bornstein, began creating photographs and 16 mm films in the 1990s as components of large-scale installations that examined issues of identity, gender, and social encounters. In 2003 Bornstein turned to the… Read More »

Process and Prints: In Conversation with Matt Saunders

Currents 114 features new work from multimedia artist Matt Saunders. Working across painting, photography, animation, and printmaking, Saunders endeavors to reveal the “analogous relationships” between seemingly distinct media. One component of the exhibition is a suite of five copper plate prints produced in collaboration with Copenhagen-based printer Niels Borch Jensen. Ratlos / Indomitable (2017) incorporates… Read More »

The Secret Of The Violinist

The 2017 exhibition A Century of Japanese Prints presented a selection of the Museum’s finest examples of modern and contemporary Japanese prints from the 20th and 21st centuries, including Onchi Kōshirō’s Impression of a Violinist (Portrait of Suwa Nejiko). In this Japanese color woodblock print, a woman plays the violin, her gaunt face harshly illuminated by bright stage lights.… Read More »

Love and Respect for Craftsmanship: Gregory Peck and H. Huntsman & Sons

Esteemed actor Gregory Peck had a decades-long association with London’s Savile Row tailor H. Huntsman & Sons. One of his classic suits from 1954 is on view in Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear, 1715–2015. In May 2016, Anthony Peck spoke about his father’s relationship with Huntsman at the Reigning Men symposium at the Los Angeles County… Read More »

Amy Granat’s Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches

Indebted to the legacies of experimental and avant-garde structural film from the 1960s and 1970s, St. Louis based multi-media artist Amy Granat has developed a distinct visual language. Her early works were often made by cutting, puncturing or scratching the surface of the film, addressing ideas of abstraction through the materiality of the medium. A… Read More »

Eve and her Nemesis: Powerful Women Enshrined on Paper

The Saint Louis Art Museum holds a large and varied collection of prints, ranging from silvery late medieval woodcuts, through instantly recognizable Andy Warhol screen prints, to contemporary American impressions created in St Louis. The promised gift of the Phoebe Dent Weil and Mark S. Weil Collection, a collection of Renaissance and Baroque masterworks now… Read More »

The Artistic Friendship of Mary Cassatt and Edgar Degas

“Someone Who Feels as I Do” The American expatriate painter Mary Cassatt and the French artist Edgar Degas formed a long, if tumultuous, artistic relationship and friendship in the late 19th century that lasted for decades. The two admired each other’s work during the early 1870s, years before they met. In 1877, Degas visited Cassatt… Read More »

A Quintessentially Female Profession

Madame Virot, Caroline Reboux, and the Paris Millinery Trade The second half of the 19th century was the heyday of the millinery trade in Paris. The industry was dominated by women, at its peak employing thousands in small, independent millinery shops throughout Paris. These shops were often times run by enterprising women, some of whom… Read More »

Textile tales of politics and patriotism

Textiles have long been used by many cultures to promote military, political, and commemorative events.  The use of textiles as vehicles for propaganda, though somewhat less known throughout history, was the focus of the 2017 exhibition Textiles: Politics and Patriotism. The exhibition shared stories and imagery woven into fabrics that deliver strong or sometimes subtle… Read More »

A Game of Nation, Modernity, and Militarism

Sugoroku, also known as e-sugoroku, is a Japanese board and dice game similar to snakes and ladders, or Chutes and Ladders, that flourished between the 18th and mid-20th centuries. Early versions of the game were intended for religious education. Depending on the whim of the die, one might reach Buddhahood, or alternatively, descend into hell.… Read More »