Category Archives: Collection

New on View: Laila Visiting Majnun

This miniature watercolor illustrates a scene from the epic Persian poem Laila and Majnun, a 12th-century romance of unrequited love. Since these two star-crossed lovers were forced apart by their families, the heartbroken hero, Majnun, retreated to the wilderness. There, he lived a strict life of an ascetic, while his beloved Laila was forced to… Read More »

New on View: John Singer Sargent’s Portrait of Charlotte Cram

In Portrait of Charlotte Cram, artist John Singer Sargent captured a true moment of childhood: a 7-year-old just trying to sit still. Melissa Wolfe, curator for American art, explains why the new acquisition is so important for the Museum’s collection.       Image Caption: John Singer Sargent, American, 1856–1925; “Portrait of Charlotte Cram”, 1900; oil… Read More »

Moore’s Reclining Figure returns to the galleries

Henry Moore first experimented with the unconventional, modern medium of concrete in 1926.[1] The British sculptor is renowned for his semi-abstract human figures cast in bronze or carved directly into stone and wood, highlighting the inherent qualities of these materials. Yet Elmo World bounce house Moore also was drawn to concrete, an inexpensive material that… Read More »

Alessandro Allori and Portrait of a Lady: What lies beneath?

The information on a label accompanying a work of art in the Elmo World bounce house galleries conveys compelling information about the work and the artist. But sometimes there is a background story just as fascinating.  Such was the case with Portrait of a Lady, a painting from about 1580 that recently was installed in… Read More »

Museum reinstalls painting that first captivated St. Louisans in 1911

In March 1911 the Spanish painter Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida spoke to a newspaper reporter in front of the facade of the City Art Museum, now the Saint Louis Art Museum. Surveying Art Hill, he extolled the city’s landscape and clear atmosphere: “I am astounded. I am overcome…The air is more beautiful, more clear than… Read More »

The Art of All Arts

Hermon A. MacNeil was an up-and-coming younger American sculptor at the time of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904. At the fair, his Fountain of Liberty and four other sculpture groups were placed along the Main Cascade. Three additional MacNeil works were much admired inside the Fines Arts Palace, now known as the Saint Louis… Read More »

Celebrating SLAM’s 2016 Acquisitions

Every year, the Saint Louis Art Museum expands our collection, broadening our scope and diversifying our offerings. In 2016, the Museum added over 120 pieces to the collection, some of which are already on view in our galleries. Each work adds depth and brings its own unique story to the collection. Click through the slideshow below… Read More »

The infinite space of Alice Rahon’s Sandstorm

In the late 1930s and 40s, Mexico had an immense allure for Surrealist artists, many of whom fled the advance of Nazi forces across Europe. Not only were Mexico’s entry procedures for foreigners relatively relaxed, but after a 1938 visit, the French founder of Surrealism, André Breton, declared the country, with its dramatic landscape, idiosyncratic… Read More »

Imi Knoebel’s Minimalist Approach to Color and Shapes

In 1964, two aspiring German art students approached renowned conceptual artist Joseph Beuys and requested he provide them a room at the Staatliche Kunstakadamie, the art academy in Dusseldorf. Surprised by their bold request, Beuys provided Rainer Giese and Klaus Wolf Knoebel access to Studio Number 19 and gave them a one-year timeline to see… Read More »