Author Archives: SLAM

Love and Respect for Craftsmanship: Gregory Peck and H. Huntsman & Sons

Esteemed actor Gregory Peck had a decades-long association with London’s Savile Row tailor H. Huntsman & Sons. One of his classic suits from 1954 is on view in Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear, 1715–2015. In May 2016, Anthony Peck spoke about his father’s relationship with Huntsman at the Reigning Men symposium at the Los Angeles County… Read More »

Amy Granat’s Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches

Indebted to the legacies of experimental and avant-garde structural film from the 1960s and 1970s, St. Louis based multi-media artist Amy Granat has developed a distinct visual language. Her early works were often made by cutting, puncturing or scratching the surface of the film, addressing ideas of abstraction through the materiality of the medium. A… Read More »

The Artistic Friendship of Mary Cassatt and Edgar Degas

“Someone Who Feels as I Do” The American expatriate painter Mary Cassatt and the French artist Edgar Degas formed a long, if tumultuous, artistic relationship and friendship in the late 19th century that lasted for decades. The two admired each other’s work during the early 1870s, years before they met. In 1877, Degas visited Cassatt… Read More »

Museum reinstalls painting that first captivated St. Louisans in 1911

In March 1911 the Spanish painter Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida spoke to a newspaper reporter in front of the facade of the City Art Museum, now the Saint Louis Art Museum. Surveying Art Hill, he extolled the city’s landscape and clear atmosphere: “I am astounded. I am overcome…The air is more beautiful, more clear than… Read More »

A Quintessentially Female Profession

Madame Virot, Caroline Reboux, and the Paris Millinery Trade The second half of the 19th century was the heyday of the millinery trade in Paris. The industry was dominated by women, at its peak employing thousands in small, independent millinery shops throughout Paris. These shops were often times run by enterprising women, some of whom… Read More »

The Art of All Arts

Hermon A. MacNeil was an up-and-coming younger American sculptor at the time of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904. At the fair, his Fountain of Liberty and four other sculpture groups were placed along the Main Cascade. Three additional MacNeil works were much admired inside the Fines Arts Palace, now known as the Saint Louis… Read More »

The infinite space of Alice Rahon’s Sandstorm

In the late 1930s and 40s, Mexico had an immense allure for Surrealist artists, many of whom fled the advance of Nazi forces across Europe. Not only were Mexico’s entry procedures for foreigners relatively relaxed, but after a 1938 visit, the French founder of Surrealism, André Breton, declared the country, with its dramatic landscape, idiosyncratic… Read More »

Textile tales of politics and patriotism

Textiles have long been used by many cultures to promote military, political, and commemorative events.  The use of textiles as vehicles for propaganda, though somewhat less known throughout history, is the focus of Textiles: Politics and Patriotism, on view in Gallery 100 through March 5, 2017. Take a close look at the works and you’ll… Read More »

Imi Knoebel’s Minimalist Approach to Color and Shapes

In 1964, two aspiring German art students approached renowned conceptual artist Joseph Beuys and requested he provide them a room at the Staatliche Kunstakadamie, the art academy in Dusseldorf. Surprised by their bold request, Beuys provided Rainer Giese and Klaus Wolf Knoebel access to Studio Number 19 and gave them a one-year timeline to see… Read More »

A Game of Nation, Modernity, and Militarism

Sugoroku, also known as e-sugoroku, is a Japanese board and dice game similar to snakes and ladders, or Chutes and Ladders, that flourished between the 18th and mid-20th centuries. Early versions of the game were intended for religious education. Depending on the whim of the die, one might reach Buddhahood, or alternatively, descend into hell.… Read More »