Featured Article

New on View: Rosalyn Drexler’s Fresh News (Men and Machines)

Painted in 1965—the heyday of Pop art in New York— Rosalyn Drexler’s Fresh News (Men and Machines) is one of a series of paintings by the artist based on media images of men working with technology. Here, Drexler appropriates and abstracts an image of two men in suits supervising an advanced commercial printing press—the new… Read More »

Featured Article

New on View: John Singer Sargent’s Portrait of Charlotte Cram

In Portrait of Charlotte Cram, artist John Singer Sargent captured a true moment of childhood: a 7-year-old just trying to sit still. Melissa Wolfe, curator for American art, explains why the new acquisition is so important for the Museum’s collection.       Image Caption: John Singer Sargent, American, 1856–1925; “Portrait of Charlotte Cram”, 1900; oil… Read More »

Modernism in Mexico: Rufino Tamayo and Carlos Mérida

Though their paintings are different in style, two artists working in mid-century Mexico—Mexican painter Rufino Tamayo (1899-1991) and Guatemalan-born artist Carlos Mérida (1891-1985)—had much in common. Both traveled broadly, making and promoting their art in Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Both artists were of partial indigenous ancestry—Tamayo was of Zapotec heritage, while Mérida… Read More »

New on View: Laila Visiting Majnun

This miniature watercolor illustrates a scene from the epic Persian poem Laila and Majnun, a 12th-century romance of unrequited love. Since these two star-crossed lovers were forced apart by their families, the heartbroken hero, Majnun, retreated to the wilderness. There, he lived a strict life of an ascetic, while his beloved Laila was forced to… Read More »

Currents 115: Jennifer Bornstein

Inspired by artists who used photography and video such as Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, and Joan Jonas, the 2017-2018 Henry L. and Natalie E. Freund Fellow, Jennifer Bornstein, began creating photographs and 16 mm films in the 1990s as components of large-scale installations that examined issues of identity, gender, and social encounters. In 2003 Bornstein turned to the… Read More »

Nuxalk carving reflects cosmopolitan site of production

An artist from coastal British Columbia created this frontlet in the middle of the 19th century. Worn on a dancer’s forehead, this carving would have featured additional components. With sea lion whiskers sticking up from the crown, a veil-like attachment of swan skin or canvas covered the dancer’s head, shoulders, and back. Moving underneath this… Read More »

Process and Prints: In Conversation with Matt Saunders

Currents 114 features new work from multimedia artist Matt Saunders. Working across painting, photography, animation, and printmaking, Saunders endeavors to reveal the “analogous relationships” between seemingly distinct media. One component of the exhibition is a suite of five copper plate prints produced in collaboration with Copenhagen-based printer Niels Borch Jensen. Ratlos / Indomitable (2017) incorporates… Read More »

The Secret Of The Violinist

The 2017 exhibition A Century of Japanese Prints presented a selection of the Museum’s finest examples of modern and contemporary Japanese prints from the 20th and 21st centuries, including Onchi Kōshirō’s Impression of a Violinist (Portrait of Suwa Nejiko). In this Japanese color woodblock print, a woman plays the violin, her gaunt face harshly illuminated by bright stage lights.… Read More »

Henry Moore’s Reclining Figure is a masterpiece in concrete

Henry Moore first experimented with the unconventional, modern medium of concrete in 1926.[1] The British sculptor is renowned for his semi-abstract human figures cast in bronze or carved directly into stone and wood, highlighting the inherent qualities of these materials. Yet Moore also was drawn to concrete, an inexpensive material that could be cast into a… Read More »

Alessandro Allori and Portrait of a Lady: What lies beneath?

The information on a label accompanying a work of art in the galleries conveys compelling information about the work and the artist. But sometimes the background story is just as fascinating.  Such is the case with Portrait of a Lady, a painting from about 1580 that offers visitors a much richer representation of the complexities… Read More »