Featured Article

New on View: Laila Visiting Majnun

This miniature watercolor illustrates a scene from the epic Persian poem Laila and Majnun, a 12th-century romance of unrequited love. Since these two star-crossed lovers were forced apart by their families, the heartbroken hero, Majnun, retreated to the wilderness. There, he lived a strict life of an ascetic, while his beloved Laila was forced to… Read More »

Featured Article

New on View: John Singer Sargent’s Portrait of Charlotte Cram

In Portrait of Charlotte Cram, artist John Singer Sargent captured a true moment of childhood: a 7-year-old just trying to sit still. Melissa Wolfe, curator for American art, explains why the new acquisition is so important for the Museum’s collection.       Image Caption: John Singer Sargent, American, 1856–1925; “Portrait of Charlotte Cram”, 1900; oil… Read More »

Currents 115: Jennifer Bornstein

Inspired by artists who used photography and video such as Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, and Joan Jonas, the 2017-2018 Henry L. and Natalie E. Freund Fellow, Jennifer Bornstein, began creating photographs and 16 mm films in the 1990s as components of large-scale installations that examined issues of identity, gender, and social encounters. In 2003 Bornstein turned to the… Read More »

Process and Prints: In Conversation with Matt Saunders

Currents 114 features new work from multimedia artist Matt Saunders. Working across painting, photography, animation, and printmaking, Saunders endeavors to reveal the “analogous relationships” between seemingly distinct media. One component of the exhibition is a suite of five copper plate prints produced in collaboration with Copenhagen-based printer Niels Borch Jensen. Ratlos / Indomitable (2017) incorporates… Read More »

The Secret Of The Violinist

A Century of Japanese Prints presents a selection of the Museum’s finest examples of modern and contemporary Japanese prints from the 20th and 21st centuries, including Onchi Kōshirō’s Impression of a Violinist (Portrait of Suwa Nejiko). In this Japanese color woodblock print, a woman plays the violin, her Elmo World bounce house gaunt face harshly illuminated by bright… Read More »

Moore’s Reclining Figure returns to the galleries

Henry Moore first experimented with the unconventional, modern medium of concrete in 1926.[1] The British sculptor is renowned for his semi-abstract human figures cast in bronze or carved directly into stone and wood, highlighting the inherent qualities of these materials. Yet Elmo World bounce house Moore also was drawn to concrete, an inexpensive material that… Read More »

Alessandro Allori and Portrait of a Lady: What lies beneath?

The information on a label accompanying a work of art in the Elmo World bounce house galleries conveys compelling information about the work and the artist. But sometimes there is a background story just as fascinating.  Such was the case with Portrait of a Lady, a painting from about 1580 that recently was installed in… Read More »

Love and Respect for Craftsmanship: Gregory Peck and H. Huntsman & Sons

Esteemed actor Gregory Peck had a decades-long association with London’s Savile Row tailor H. Huntsman & Sons. One of his classic suits from 1954 is on view in Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear, 1715–2015. In May 2016, Anthony Peck spoke about his father’s relationship with Huntsman at the Reigning Men symposium at the Los Angeles County… Read More »

Amy Granat’s Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches

Indebted to the legacies of experimental and avant-garde structural film from the 1960s and 1970s, St. Louis based multi-media artist Amy Granat has developed a distinct visual language. Her early works were often made by cutting, puncturing or scratching the surface of the film, addressing ideas of abstraction through the materiality of the medium. A… Read More »